How to Stay Efficient and Engaged While Remote Working

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Approx. 5 min. read
Last updated: May 18, 2018

How to stay motivated and engaged to the workplace when working from home?

With the trend toward working remotely continuing to climb, we can expect that more employers and employees are going to look to remote working as not only a viable option but as an opportunity create a happier, more productive workforce.

Telecommuting skeptics may argue that work-from-home (WFH) employees are less productive, more easily distracted, and lose out on the cohesiveness and collaboration offered by working in the same physical space. However, reports suggest that working from home can actually make people more productive: according to one report, 2 out of 3 managers feel employees increase their productivity with remote work.

Remote working not only makes employees more productive, but it makes them less likely to leave. In fact, statistics show that up to 82 percent of people said telecommuting reduced stress and improved morale, claiming that they felt even more connected and engaged with their colleagues, thus leading to more loyalty from those employees. With so many positive reasons to consider remote working, it still begs the question, “is it for everyone?”

Admittedly, for some, as exciting as the prospect of telecommuting may be, having the discipline to move from a traditional office environment to a digital workplace could feel like a huge transition. When making the move to a remote workspace arrangement, it’s critical to set yourself up for success. Here are some ways to stay efficient when working from home.

Find Motivation

When you don’t have a commute, strict hours, and a boss looking over your shoulder, and you spend the majority of your day alone, it’s understandable that from time to time your motivation may wane. One of the best ways to find motivation is by sticking to a schedule.

Give yourself a routine that not only makes you more productive but gives you a blueprint for having control over your time. Wake up and shower at the same time each morning, schedule routine work tasks for the same time each day and try ending work around the same time in the evenings. You’ll find that it’s much easier to stay motivated when you accomplish tasks at the same time every day.

Set Up Daily Goals

Setting up goals for each day ensures that we have a roadmap for how that day should look. We know what our top priorities are, and we can schedule our time and attention around making sure that our work is focused on accomplishing those goals.

Each night, try writing down your top three to four goals for the next day. This way, you can begin each morning ready to tackle those goals. You’re less likely to be distracted by other priorities if you’re absolutely sure of which ones need the most attention.

Create a Dedicated Workspace

Of course, a home office is ideal, but if you’re not in a position to secure an entire room, carve out space somewhere in your home or apartment designated only for work. Try to have a desk or table and a chair that is solely dedicated to you performing your job and eliminate any unnecessary clutter. Make sure that whoever you share your home with knows that it’s not to be used for any other reason. Remember that though you’ll be remote, because of tools like Skype in your digital workplace that allow people to see you, your work environment should still appear professional.

Working from home

Eliminate Distractions

Working from home can sometimes mean that distractions not normally associated with working in an office may come into play. Establish some habits and “rules” for yourself that help you eliminate any distractions up front.

Put your phone on airplane mode to discourage yourself from checking text messages and alerts. If you have pets, make sure they’re not going to be trying to get your attention while you’re working. Make it a rule that you don’t answer the door to solicitors. Also, close out of any browsers or websites that may distract you, like social media and search engines.

Protect Your Schedule

Once your family and friends know that you work from home, you may find that they’ll be looking to meet for coffee or ask for favors such as helping with childcare. Set clear boundaries with the people in your life that your work schedule will be the same as it always has been, and that the expectation that you are available to your employer has not changed.

Stay in Touch with Your Colleagues and Industry

A common concern among employers is that their remote workers will begin to lose their connection to the rest of their team and the industry. One of the best things about a digital workplace is the advent of tools like Slack that keep teams connected and informed, without losing cohesiveness or a lack of progress on projects.

To stay on top of industry trends within your company and beyond, consider an employee communication tool like Smarp that allows you to share relevant content and knowledge with your teams, your company and your networks around your industry. Remote work can make you feel out-of-touch of the most important recent developments in your company and the most relevant industry trends, so an internal knowledge sharing hub is a must for any remote worker.

To read more about content hubs, check out our this link:

Need a Super Power? Get an Internal Content Hub! - Infographic

For all the benefits of working from home, it’s important to set yourself up for success by implementing ways to be efficient. While working remotely, be sure have a digital workplace that allows you to effectively and seamlessly co-work and stay engaged with your colleagues throughout your workday. Make sure your digital workplace celebrates a knowledge sharing culture, and you can rest assured you stay engaged to your workplace even when you work remotely.

To read more about organizational knowledge sharing, feel free to download our guide below:

Free Guide - Organizational Knowledge Sharing 101: How to get Started